Frequently Asked Questions

Never hesitate to call us at (888) 513-1874 if you have additional questions.

  • Latching Relays
  • General Questions

What is a latching relay?

  • A latching relay (also called "impulse", "keep", bi-stable, or "stay" relays) maintains either contact position, indefinitely, without continuous power applied to the coil.

Why a latching relay?

  • A latching relay coil, unlike a non-latching or mono-stable relay, consumes power only for an instant while the relay is being switched. Since the relay coil does not need to be energized constantly, this results in a much lower power usage. The relay will retain this position (state) across a power outage.

Can a latching relay be used in conjuntion with current measurement?

  • KG has a long history in providing both CT's and shunts, sometimes integrated into the custom relay design. KG provides design assistance for both types of current measuring.

    A current transformer (CT) is a type of transformer that is used to measure AC Current. It produces an alternating current (AC) in its secondary which is proportional to the AC current in its primary. A CT is more expensive than a shunt but is better at higher tempratures. A shunt is a manganin resistor, of accurately known resistance, is placed in parallel with the moving coil galvanometer, thus all of the current to be measured will flow through it. The voltage voltmeter drop across the shunt is proportional to the current flowing through it and as its resistance is known, a voltmeter connected across the shunt can be scaled to directly display the current value. A shunt is much cheaper than a CT but at higher temperatures it is susceptible to thermal drift.

     

What forms of customization are available?

  • The majority of the relay assemblies we produce are custom to a specific application. This customization includes the addition of brass terminals welded on to the end of the copper leads, integrated shunts and CT's, cage clamps along with screws, standard screw tabs welded onto the end of flexible braided copper cable (Flexwire) or custom relay terminals. KG provides world class design assistance in cases of customization.

I would like to have brass terminals attached to the relay, what method is used?

  • There are a few ways to attach brass terminals to copper. KG has spent a significant amount of time and money perfecting a welding process that provides the highest performance at the lowest cost. We have also seen some cases where the brass terminal is swaged (rivited) to the copper terminal but we do not recommend this joint style. The expansion coefficients are differant between brass and copper and overtime, this type of joint can become loose.

Why KG?

  • KG Technologies is the global leader in world class switching solutions for the energy management market. We have developed and designed patented technology for latching relays for the Smart Grid, homes and cars that is changing the way the world handles high-current, high-voltage switching applications. For more than a decade our relays have allowed our customers to manage their energy loads more effectively, through remote disconnect/reconnect capabilities, while meeting the world’s highest standards (UL, IEC and ANSI) at the best cost. Our focus on the best value extends through to our design assistance and world class manufacturing and logistics.

Can a latching relay be used in conjuntion with current measurement?

  • KG has a long history in providing both CT's and shunts, sometimes integrated into the custom relay design. KG provides design assistance for both types of current measuring.

    A current transformer (CT) is a type of transformer that is used to measure AC Current. It produces an alternating current (AC) in its secondary which is proportional to the AC current in its primary. A CT is more expensive than a shunt but is better at higher tempratures. A shunt is a manganin resistor, of accurately known resistance, is placed in parallel with the moving coil galvanometer, thus all of the current to be measured will flow through it. The voltage voltmeter drop across the shunt is proportional to the current flowing through it and as its resistance is known, a voltmeter connected across the shunt can be scaled to directly display the current value. A shunt is much cheaper than a CT but at higher temperatures it is susceptible to thermal drift.

     

What forms of customization are available?

  • The majority of the relay assemblies we produce are custom to a specific application. This customization includes the addition of brass terminals welded on to the end of the copper leads, integrated shunts and CT's, cage clamps along with screws, standard screw tabs welded onto the end of flexible braided copper cable (Flexwire) or custom relay terminals. KG provides world class design assistance in cases of customization.

I would like to have brass terminals attached to the relay, what method is used?

  • There are a few ways to attach brass terminals to copper. KG has spent a significant amount of time and money perfecting a welding process that provides the highest performance at the lowest cost. We have also seen some cases where the brass terminal is swaged (rivited) to the copper terminal but we do not recommend this joint style. The expansion coefficients are differant between brass and copper and overtime, this type of joint can become loose.

Do You Have More Questions?

* = Required field